Here I go again, reading books everyone reads because there’s apparently something culturally relevant about them. Except for this one didn’t let me down as much as the other books I’ve read that fall into this category. Hallelujah!
If you’re old like me, you remember when Dawson’s Creek came out, there was commenting to the effect of, “Kids don’t talk like that!” You could apply that same complaint to the way the teenagers in this book talk. It’s fucking preposterous.
Overall, the pacing is good, and in general, it’s a quick read because there’s tons of white space on every page. I’m assuming in part because it’s made to be consumed by fifteen-year-olds. Mr. Green is very good at talking to that age group, as evidenced by the fact that his tumblr is hugely popular. I am not fifteen any more, so some of this charm was lost on me.
I’d recommend this if you wanna burn through a book in a day or two and feel at one with the zeitgeist.

Here I go again, reading books everyone reads because there’s apparently something culturally relevant about them. Except for this one didn’t let me down as much as the other books I’ve read that fall into this category. Hallelujah!

If you’re old like me, you remember when Dawson’s Creek came out, there was commenting to the effect of, “Kids don’t talk like that!” You could apply that same complaint to the way the teenagers in this book talk. It’s fucking preposterous.

Overall, the pacing is good, and in general, it’s a quick read because there’s tons of white space on every page. I’m assuming in part because it’s made to be consumed by fifteen-year-olds. Mr. Green is very good at talking to that age group, as evidenced by the fact that his tumblr is hugely popular. I am not fifteen any more, so some of this charm was lost on me.

I’d recommend this if you wanna burn through a book in a day or two and feel at one with the zeitgeist.

6 notes

  1. lacey said: so did you not cry at all when reading this?
  2. sharingtime posted this